Top Ten All Time
 
1
Deer Antler Velvet: Does It Work?
 
2
Bane Workout: Get Big Like Bane [The Dark Knight Rises]

 
3
Man of Steel Workout: Henry Cavill
 
4
Stephen Amell: Look the Part With The Arrow Workout

 
5
Tom Hardy’s Official Warrior Workout [Tommy Conlon]
 
6
Hafthor Julius Bjornsson’s Diet: The Mountain [Game of Thrones]

 
7
Bane Workout: Traps [The Dark Knight Rises]
 
8
Stephen Amell Workout and Diet

 
9
Bane Workout: Shoulders [The Dark Knight Rises]
 
10
Rumors and Facts: Tom Hardy’s Bane Workout [The Dark Knight Rises]

Mark Wahlberg: The Official Fighter Workout
Previous
RANDOM
Aphrodisiac: Fact or Fiction?
Next

Achilles: The Myth Behind the Almost Immortal

by guest on February 26, 2013
Use your ← → (arrow) keys to browse

Achilles is one of the most popular figures in Greek mythology, especially since he’s one of the heroes (or villains, depending on which side you’re on) of the Trojan War. His legend is spreading even up to now. However, people are torn as to whether he was a hero or a villain. But first of all, did he really exist?

While we will definitely explore his existence, there is no doubt that we can learn about Achilles. Strong, fierce, almost unstoppable. Almost immortal. Almost. Be a person who focuses on your weaknesses. Turn them into your strengths. Do that and I promise you, you will do more than you ever thought capable and you will be ready for any surprises that come your way. Bad at math? Work at it and don’t wait until you are stuck in debt to try to figure things out. Unsure about your health? Read up on it and don’t wait for a medical emergency. Horrible stamina and endurance? Don’t wait until you need to run to someone to save them or run away from something to save your life. Work on your weaknesses.

Achilles & Greek Mythology

achillesJust like all fixtures in Greek mythology, Achilles is also just a myth. However, this didn’t stop people from following his story, as his story features some of the most interesting points in Greek mythology.

For starters, he is known as the greatest warrior in Iliad – a work by the poet Homer. An interesting point is also the fact that he was considered to be invulnerable, except when his heel is hit. In fact, he died just because of a small wound from an arrow that hit his heel. This led to the commonly-used term, Achilles’ heel.

The Origin of Achilles

achilles discovered

His name is considered as a combination of “akhos” or grief and “Laos” or tribe or nation. Simply put, his name represented the grief of the people.

He was born to Thetis, a nymph, and Peleus, the Myrmidons’ king. It was Thetis who tried to turn him into an immortal by dipping him in the river Styx. Unfortunately for the boy, Thetis wasn’t able to dip his heel in the river, as it was the part that Thetis was holding while dipping the boy. This led to his sole weakness.

His Legend in the Trojan War

achilles trojan horse

He was known as a hero because of his victories, but he’s also known as a villain because of his sometimes uncontrollable rage that became evident in the Trojan War. His rage was the focus of Homer’s book.

The war basically started because he was angered. The story started with him withdrawing from battle against Agamemnon, with Agamemnon taking a woman named Chryseis as a slave. The god Apollo sent a plague to the Greeks because Agamemnon wouldn’t return the slave to her father. Calchas, a prophet, asked for protection from Achilles so that he’ll speak regarding the source of the plague. He then said that Agamemnon should return Chryseis to her father. Agamemnon did so, but also took Briseis to replace Chryseis. Briseis was the battle prize of Achilles, someone who he loved, and this angered him.

Looking to regain his honor and continue being a hero to his people, he asked for the help of Zeus to turn the tide in their favor. However, another conflict took place, as the then leader of the Trojans, Hector, killed Patroclus, a beloved friend of Achilles. This angered him, and he hunted Hector down, killing a lot of men and angering a lot of gods in the process. Just as he was about to kill Hector, he showed a side very common with a villain – a side that showed his fury and rage.

Another Revenge

Another close friend, Antilochus, was killed. Achilles of course killed Memnon, the killer, as revenge. Memnon was an Ethiopian king at that time, and was the son of a goddess.

If there is a lesson to be learned from Achilles it should be to control your anger. Even with heroic intentions, sometimes being angry can enrage you and this is when the hero becomes the villain.

Use your ← → (arrow) keys to browse

What's your reaction?
Give Me More
0%
Confused
14%
I Expected Better
57%
That Was Useful
29%
guest
The Confitdent Brotherhood is a collection of staffers who have worked together to help provide you with content that will make you strong, smart, and skillful.

Leave a Response

 
READ MORE
Knowledge

Study Says Running Barefoot Could Make You Smarter


 
READ MORE

How to Make Tuna Quinoa Patties

 
READ MORE

The FDA to Redefine What ‘Healthy’ Means

 
READ MORE

How Big is Your Salmonella Risk Really?


 
READ MORE

How Exercise Makes Your Bones Stronger

 
READ MORE

Most Common Pushup Mistakes

 
READ MORE

Research Suggests Trick For Ordering Healthier Food


 
READ MORE
Get Fit

Research Pinpointed the Perfect Amount to Lift Each Week


 
READ MORE

Should You Be Eating More Vegetables?

 
READ MORE

How Quickly Do You Really Get Out of Shape?

 
READ MORE

Study Says Coffee and Wine are Good For the Gut


 
READ MORE

Why You Should Roast Your Cauliflower

 
READ MORE

Foods that Are High in Phosphorus

 
READ MORE

The Best Snacks to Eat at Night


 
READ MORE
Motivation

Motivational Quotes From Famous Athletes


 
READ MORE

Low Carb Breakfasts that are Still Filling

 
READ MORE

What Exactly is “Leaky Gut” Syndrome?

 
READ MORE

How to Get the Most Out of a Recovery Day


 
READ MORE

Health Quotes that Will Inspire Your Week

 
READ MORE

Should You Workout When You’re Sick?

 
READ MORE

Why it’s Hard Sleeping Somewhere New


Load More
End of the line!
Test